CubaBrief: Hundreds of artists and academics publicly challenged the Ministry of Culture and officials agreed to dialogue then back tracked on agreement

Despite the best efforts of the Castro regime to shutdown and dismantle the San Isidro protest, the regime ended up with a much larger problem than 14 protesters in a modest home in the neighborhood of San Isidro in Havana. Young people, mostly artists and academics, began gathering throughout the day of November 27th in front of the Ministry of Culture and their numbers continued growing into the evening demanding that the Minister meet with the protesters to negotiate terms for a dialogue. On a positive note the last of the hunger strikers, Maykel Castillo, ended his strike on November 30, 2020. On a further positive note there will be a protest at the Cuban Embassy in Washington DC on Thursday, December 3rd at 3:00pm. Please bring poetry to read at the protest.

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Thirty representatives elected by the hundreds gathered went in and met with the officials, and emerged with a commitment to dialogue and to consider the points raised by the protesters. Meanwhile the dictatorship sent truckloads of plainclothes security to surround the demonstrators, and to intimidate them. They also closed off the path to the Ministry of Culture, and began using tear gas and physical force to prevent others from continuing to join the protesters. Instead of following through with a dialogue to resolve the differences that had generated the protests the regime launched a media assault against the San Isidro Movement against the protesters. The autocracy in Havana has reason to be concerned. International media coverage has reported on the protest, and their demands.

Consider that on November 26, 2020 at 8pm reports emerged that the Castro regime shut off internet and cell phone traffic, shortly before raiding the San Isidro Movement headquarters, and network data from the NetBlocks Internet Observatory confirmed a wider and sustained “partial disruption to social media and streaming platforms in Cuba between Friday 27 November 2020 and Monday 30 November 2020. The disruptions are likely to limit the flow of independently sourced information from Cuba. The incident follows three days of limited service and comes amid protests in Havana by a group calling for artistic rights.” Twitter and WhatsApp were apparently impacted.

Young Cubans gathered outside the Ministry of Culture on November 27, 2020

Young Cubans gathered outside the Ministry of Culture on November 27, 2020

On November 27, 2020 the independent publication Diario de Cuba pieced together the different videos surrounding the raid on the San Isidro headquarters the day before and posted them edited together into one video on Youtube. Regime officials claimed that the raid was due to concerns about COVID-19, but the individuals dressed like doctors did not behave like doctors, and the crowd that they gathered outside to shout revolutionary slogans, without mask coverings, did not accord with protocols for the epidemic. Nor returning the bulk of the San Isidro activists to their homes within hours of their detention.

Despite the shutting down of communication and the subterfuge surrounding the raid on the San Isidro Movement headquarters the truth of what was unfolding still got out and circulated among many Cubans who wanted to demonstrate their solidarity with action.

The Wall Street Journal, on November 30, 2020 in the article “Cuban Leadership Confronts a Rare Dissident Movement” and this prestigious publication shared their demands. “We demand the right to have rights…The right of free expression, of free creation, the right to dissent,” said Katherine Bisquet, a young poet, reading the activists’ manifesto by the light of cellphones outside of the ministry where streetlights were turned off. Videos posted on social media showed Ms. Bisquet saying that she spoke for all Cuban citizens.”

The dictatorship was prepared for a major crackdown, but opted for a negotiated solution to avoid the spectacle, but then reneged. Reuters reported that “[t]he protest ended before dawn on Saturday only after officials met with 30 of the demonstrators and agreed to continue talking and to urgently review the case of a detained member of the San Isidro crew and a rapper sentenced this month to eight months in jail on charges of contempt. It also agreed to ensure independent artists in the future were not harassed.”

But just hours later “state television ran a 90-minute special attacking the rapper and other dissident artists and broadcasting visuals of their interactions with U.S. diplomats and Miami exiles,” reported Reuters.

This line of attack is hypocritical when one considers that on March 17, 1958 Fidel Castro’s candidate for provisional president Manuel Urrutia, along with a delegation of other supporters in exile of the future Cuban dictator’s July 26th movement, met with officials at the State Department. They successfully lobbied the U.S. government and argued that arms shipments to Cuba were for hemispheric defense, and they claimed that Batista using them against Cuban nationals was in violation of the conditions agreed to between the two countries.

On the same day the Cuban Government presented to the U.S. Embassy in Havana a formal note protesting the delay in the shipment of M-1 rifles to the Cuban Army, and warned that it would weaken  the Cuban government and lead to its possible downfall. 

On March 26, 1958 in another telegram from the State Department to the U.S. Embassy in Havana the view was expressed how the arms embargo could lead to the fall of Batista’s regime:

“Department has considered possibility its actions could have an adverse psychological effect GOC and could unintentionally contribute to or accelerate eventual Batista downfall. On other hand, shipment US combat arms at this time would probably invite increased resentment against US and associate it with Batista strong arm methods, especially following so closely on heels of following developments:

  1. Government publicly desisted from peace efforts.

  2. Government suspended guarantees again.

  3. Batista expressed confidence Government will win elections with his candidate and insists they will be held despite suspension guarantees but has made no real effort to satisfy public opinion on their fairness and effectiveness as possible means achieve fair and acceptable solution.

  4. Batista announced would increase size arms and informed you he would again undertake mass population shift Oriente, and otherwise acted in manner to discourage those who supported or could be brought to support peaceful settlement by constructive negotiations. “

News of the arms embargo on the Batista regime broke in The New York Times on April 3, 1958, the psychological blow was delivered and the days of the Batista regime were numbered. It should not be a surprise that the Castro regime howls when their opponents reach out and lobby U.S. diplomats for a pro-democracy policy, because they did it in 1958 to get rid of the previous dictator using diplomatic maneuvers in addition to their armed struggle. Unlike Castro and the July 26th Movement, the San Isidro Movement is nonviolent and seeks a negotiated solution for a Cuba where freedom of expression is no longer a crime.

Amaury Pacheco, of the San Isidro Movement, takes a photo of the crowd of supporters behind him.

Amaury Pacheco, of the San Isidro Movement, takes a photo of the crowd of supporters behind him.

They are not alone, and scores of civil society organizations from around the world have spoken out on their behalf. On November 26, 2020 a long list of international and Cuban civil society organisations, members of Cuban independent media, activists, and Cuban citizens – condemned “the harassment, police violence, human rights violations, and repressive acts perpetrated by Cuban authorities against artists, journalists, and independent civil society actors in response to peaceful demonstrations against the arrest and subsequent arbitrary conviction of the musician and member of Movimiento San Isidro (MSI), Denis Solís González,” and urged “Cuban authorities to act in accordance with their obligation to preserve the life and health, and safety of the 14 activists at the MSI headquarters since November 16, demanding the release of the musician Denis Solis González.” Both the Trump State Department and the Biden National Security team have expressed their solidarity with the San Isidro Movement.

The dictatorship now has a heavy militarized presence on the streets, and physically attacking or arbitrarily detaining Cubans who demonstrate their solidarity with the San Isidro Movement.

This is the fourth CubaBrief focused on the events concerning the San Isidro Movement, and their protest against police violence, and for the freedom of fellow artist Denis Solis. It will most likely not be the last. Lamentably, today activists must also be calling for the freedom of Luis Manuel Otero.

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The Wall Street Journal, November 30, 2020

Cuban Leadership Confronts a Rare Dissident Movement

Musicians, writers, painters and Black activists peacefully challenge Communist government’s grip on expression

A group of young people sang and played music during a peaceful protest by the Ministry of Culture in Havana early Saturday morning. yander zamora/EPA/Shutterstock

A group of young people sang and played music during a peaceful protest by the Ministry of Culture in Havana early Saturday morning. yander zamora/EPA/Shutterstock

By José de Córdoba and Santiago PérezNov. 30, 2020 3:25 pm ET

An alliance of hip-hop musicians, writers, internationally known artists and Black activists has emerged as a driving force against censorship and government repression in Cuba, prompting a rare Communist government action: to hold talks about freedom of expression.

Hundreds of Cubans, many of them young artists from elite schools, protested in front of the country’s stately neoclassical Ministry of Culture in Havana’s upscale Vedado district, overnight on Friday. Protests of any sort are very rare in Cuba

“We demand the right to have rights…The right of free expression, of free creation, the right to dissent,” said Katherine Bisquet, a young poet, reading the activists’ manifesto by the light of cellphones outside of the ministry where streetlights were turned off. Videos posted on social media showed Ms. Bisquet saying that she spoke for all Cuban citizens.

Photo: ernesto mastrascusa/EPA/ShutterstockCuban poet Katherine Bisquet read the activists’ manifesto by the light of cellphones outside of the Ministry of Culture early on Saturday.

Photo: ernesto mastrascusa/EPA/Shutterstock

Cuban poet Katherine Bisquet read the activists’ manifesto by the light of cellphones outside of the Ministry of Culture early on Saturday.

The protests—sparked by the violent arrest Thursday of members of a small artists’ collective—were joined by ordinary Cubans as well as some of Cuba’s leading artistic lights, including the influential film director Fernando Pérez and renowned actor Jorge Perugorría. After hours of protests, singing and poetry, the ministry made the unusual move of allowing some 30 protesters inside to discuss their grievances with senior officials. The government considers many of them to be U.S.-financed enemies of Cuba’s revolution.

“We described the fear and harassment that we experience every day, and we told them that we didn’t feel represented by them,” said Aminta D’Cardenas, one of the activists who entered the ministry. “Their response was somewhat cynical. They told us they had no knowledge of what was happening,” she said by telephone from Havana.

The protest was possibly the largest peaceful demonstration since Fidel Castro took power in 1959, marking growing dissatisfaction by the island’s young artists.

Several artists staged a hunger strike in the apartment of Luis Manuel Otero, an artist known for his politically charged performances.Photo: Ernesto Mastrascusa/Zuma Press

Several artists staged a hunger strike in the apartment of Luis Manuel Otero, an artist known for his politically charged performances.

Photo: Ernesto Mastrascusa/Zuma Press

Cuba’s totalitarian control is facing growing challenges less than two years after it allowed internet services for mobile phones, making social apps a key tool to organize spontaneous protests and share information about arrests.

Some of these artists are also growing more independent by selling their art to foreign collectors and exhibiting their work in globally acclaimed museums and galleries. An archipelago of independent media, galleries, and artists’ collectives have flourished in the past few years, helped by the Obama administration’s short-lived opening to Cuba before it was abruptly curbed by the Trump administration.

“What has happened here in Cuba is unheard of and historic,” said Abraham Jiménez, an independent journalist who participated in the protest. “It shows there is a generation that thinks differently and is willing to face the state and tell it to stop this repression because Cuban society must change.”

Havana has been reeling from a triple whammy of woes—rounds of crippling sanctions imposed by the Trump administration, a dizzying collapse in aid from Cuba’s main ally, Venezuela and the ravages of Covid-19—all of which have hammered the island’s tourism-driven economy.

Cuba now hopes the incoming Biden administration will lift some U.S. sanctions. But there are risks.

“If the government represses harshly, it could make it impossible for Biden to move on a path towards normalization,” said Jorge Castañeda, a former Mexican foreign minister.

In a tweet Sunday, Jake Sullivan, President-elect Joe Biden’s National Security Adviser-designate, said Mr. Biden supported the Cuban people in their struggle for liberty, called for the government to release peaceful protesters, and said Cubans must be allowed to exercise “the universal right to freedom of expression.”

After leaving the meeting, Ms. Bisquet said the government agreed to a continuing dialogue with protesters, to not hound artists in state media, and to examine the criminal case against a rapper who had been summarily tried and sentenced to an eight-month prison term, according to videos posted in social media.

Mr. Otero acted as a link between low-income Black artists and a broader movement of internationally acclaimed artists and intellectuals.Photo: alexandre meneghini/Reuters

Mr. Otero acted as a link between low-income Black artists and a broader movement of internationally acclaimed artists and intellectuals.

Photo: alexandre meneghini/Reuters

But within hours of Ms. Bisquet’s comments, the regime began to backtrack, said Tania Bruguera, a renowned visual artist who participated in the protest. Cuban state television, the Foreign Ministry, and the ruling Communist Party’s newspaper Granma went on the attack on Saturday, airing segments criticizing members of the San Isidro Movement—the targeted artists’ collective—as paid agents of the U.S. government seeking to undermine the government.

In a tweet Sunday, Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel wrote that the movement was a President Trump-driven reality show and an “imperial spectacle to destroy our identity and again make us submit.”

From its first days, the Castro regime has periodically clashed with writers and artists over the issues of censorship and control. The government’s latest round of troubles with artists date to 2018 after the passage of a draconian decree that greatly tightened censorship.

The artists and singers “founded the San Isidro Movement to fight back against this Orwellian law on culture,” said Ted Henken, a Cuba expert at New York’s Baruch College.

The San Isidro movement was born in a namesake port district in Havana, one of the city’s poorest and most densely populated quarters, where trees occasionally grow from roofless, derelict houses. Black activists say that young residents facing unemployment are constantly surveilled and harassed by security forces seeking to quell potential social unrest.

The latest scuffle began with protests against the detention of Denis Solís, a young Black resident of San Isidro. Mr. Solís, a rapper who was involved in frequent incidents with the police, had struggled since the government confiscated his bicycle taxi, acquaintances say.

The hip-hop artist Osvaldo ‘Navy’ Navarro, left, pictured aside his musical partner, was briefly detained in a protest for Mr. Solis’ release.Photo: Santiago Perez/The Wall Street Journal

The hip-hop artist Osvaldo ‘Navy’ Navarro, left, pictured aside his musical partner, was briefly detained in a protest for Mr. Solis’ release.

Photo: Santiago Perez/The Wall Street Journal

In early November, after police raided his house, Mr. Solís’ heated discussion with police officers landed him in jail. After a swift summary judgment, he was sentenced to eight months in prison for contempt.

“Denis represents Cuba’s young Black community, those who are at the very bottom of the pyramid,” said Osvaldo “Navy” Navarro, a hip-hop artist who was briefly detained in a protest over Mr. Solis’ arrest.

Members of the San Isidro Movement staged a hunger strike for Mr. Solis in the apartment of Luis Manuel Otero, an artist known for his politically charged performances. In 2018, Mr. Otero tried to cover himself with his own excrement in front of Havana’s emblematic Capitol, saying that inmates in the country’s prisons cover themselves with excrement so guards won’t touch them.

Fellow artists say that Mr. Otero acted as a link between low-income Black artists and the broader movement of internationally acclaimed painters, visual artists and young intellectuals educated at Cuba’s elite schools. In mid-November Mr. Otero and others went on a hunger strike. He is currently hospitalized and under police custody.

“What we are seeing now is that artists have created an umbrella group for the expression of a lot of people,” said Abel González, a young curator and member of art collectives involved in the protests. “It’s like a Trojan Horse confronting a hard, monolithic institution like the Cuban government.”

Write to José de Córdoba at jose.decordoba@wsj.com and Santiago Pérez at santiago.perez@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/cuban-leadership-confronts-a-rare-dissident-movement-11606767900

Reuters, November 29, 2020

Cuban government backtracks on deal with protesters

By Marc Frank

HAVANA (Reuters) – Communist-run Cuba over the weekend launched an all-out rhetorical assault through state-run media on a rare protest that took place Friday for freedom of expression, branding it part of an ongoing effort by the United States to create an uprising.

FILE PHOTO: People gather in front of the culture ministry to show solidarity with dissident artists and to demand a dialogue over limits on freedom of expression, in Havana, Cuba, November 27, 2020. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

FILE PHOTO: People gather in front of the culture ministry to show solidarity with dissident artists and to demand a dialogue over limits on freedom of expression, in Havana, Cuba, November 27, 2020. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

The Friday stakeout around the culture ministry of around 300 creatives was sparked by authorities’ crackdown on the San Isidro Movement of dissident artists and activists that formed two years ago to protest curbs on freedom of expression.

The protest ended before dawn on Saturday only after officials met with 30 of the demonstrators and agreed to continue talking and to urgently review the case of a detained member of the San Isidro crew and a rapper sentenced this month to eight months in jail on charges of contempt. It also agreed to ensure independent artists in the future were not harassed.

But just hours later the government called in the top U.S. diplomat on the island, charge de affairs Timothy Zúñiga-Brown, for a scolding over “grave interference in Cuba’s internal affairs” as state television ran a 90-minute special attacking the rapper and other dissident artists and broadcasting visuals of their interactions with U.S. diplomats and Miami exiles.

“Sovereign Cuba accepts no interference … The revolutionary ones will fight back,” President Miguel Diaz-Canel said in one of a series of Twitter posts accusing the San Isidro movement of being a “reality show” on social media created by “U.S. imperialists.”

Diaz-Canel said much the same at a pro-government rally Sunday of a few thousand young people.

“In less than 24 hours the Culture Ministry has broken three of the five accords,” performance artists Tania Bruguera said at a Sunday news conference held by some of those who participated in the talks with the government.

Most present at the press conference denounced continued harassment of dissent and the branding of their efforts as a CIA plot, though they also expressed hope the dialogue would continue as promised.

Friday’s protest came after authorities besieged the movement’s headquarters in Old Havana’s San Isidro district on Thursday, breaking up a hunger strike there that had started to gain international attention.

Security forces forcibly removed and briefly detained the five members on hunger strike and nine other people in the house, citing violations of coronavirus protocols.

“We support the Cuban people in their struggle for liberty,” Jake Sullivan, U.S. President-elect Joe Biden’s national security adviser wrote on Twitter.

“The Cuban people must be allowed to exercise the universal right to freedom of expression,” he said.

Reporting by Marc Frank; Editing by Daniel Wallis

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-cuba-politics-opposition-idUSKBN28A00J?taid=5fc4686e9870190001e52311&utm_campaign=trueAnthem:+Trending+Content&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter

The Washington Post, November 28, 2020

Cuba’s raid on dissident creatives shows how much the government fears the power of art

Opinion by Editorial Board

November 28, 2020 at 8:00 a.m. EST

Cubans in Barcelona demonstrate in support of the San Isidro Movement on Nov. 24., 2020. The movement is a collection of artists, academics and journalists protesting the Cuban government. (AFP/Getty Images)

Cubans in Barcelona demonstrate in support of the San Isidro Movement on Nov. 24., 2020. The movement is a collection of artists, academics and journalists protesting the Cuban government. (AFP/Getty Images)

CUBA’S POLICE broke down the door of an artists’ collective in Old Havana on Thursday night and detained about 14 people, several of whom were on a hunger strike. Most were later released, but the raid showed just how uneasy the Cuban government is with even a hint of protest or whisper of dissent. Art must run free, but in Cuba it must obey.

The raid was directed at the San Isidro Movement, a loose collection of creative types made up of “ghetto rappers, design professors, dissident poets, art specialists, scientists and regular citizens,” as writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez, a contributor to The Post, described it. The members started a hunger strike to protest the arrest of one of their own, Denis Solís, an activist and rebellious rapper who had an argument this month with a police officer who broke into his home without a court order. Mr. Solís called the officer a “chicken in uniform” and circulated a video of the confrontation on social media. Just days after his arrest on Nov. 9, he was sentenced to eight months in prison for “contempt” of authority.

The San Isidro Movement was galvanized to protest: first a poetry reading, then a sit-in and then a hunger strike this month. Word of the protest was spreading rapidly online. The pretext for the raid was a flimsy excuse about testing for the coronavirus. But it spoke volumes about Cuba’s rulers. Freethinking artists with connections to social media make them really nervous. The government blocked access to Facebook and Instagram on the island during the raid, a clue that it wasn’t about the pandemic at all.

The members of the San Isidro Movement have been active in protesting new restrictions on Cuba’s creative and vibrant artists and musicians. On Dec. 7, 2018, the government imposed Decree 349, which required anyone engaged in artistic activity to be evaluated and registered by state institutions. This would essentially make it illegal for artists to work without being registered and give the dictatorship a new and stronger method to control artistic expression and repress dissent.

This is not a new battle. One of Fidel Castro’s most famous dictums came in June 1961 in response to Lunes, a culture supplement to Revolución, the newspaper mouthpiece of the revolution. The supplement was filled with freethinking writers, leading to the charge that it was undermining the revolution. Mr. Castro declared that, when it came to artistic expression, “Inside the revolution, everything. Outside the revolution, nothing.” Lunes ceased publication within months.

Dictatorships have an uneasy relationship with artists, writers, performers and all creative people. Tyrants know well the power of culture to move people. Writers, as Joseph Stalin put it, are “engineers of the human soul.” But the dictators delude themselves into thinking they can control these souls. What’s happening in Cuba is another example of the power of art and free expression to defy those who would destroy it.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/cubas-raid-on-dissident-creatives-shows-how-much-the-government-fears-the-power-of-art/2020/11/27/40df83b2-30d7-11eb-96c2-aac3f162215d_story.html

Pen International, November 26, 2020

Cuba: Urgent Call to Preserve the Lives of the Strikers Concentrated in Movimiento San Isidro’s Headquarters

Thursday 26 November 2020

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The undersigned – international and Cuban civil society organisations, members of Cuban independent media, activists, and Cuban citizens – condemn the harassment, police violence, human rights violations, and repressive acts perpetrated by Cuban authorities against artists, journalists, and independent civil society actors in response to peaceful demonstrations against the arrest and subsequent arbitrary conviction of the musician and member of Movimiento San Isidro (MSI), Denis Solís González.

We, therefore, urge Cuban authorities to act in accordance with their obligation to preserve the life and health, and safety of the 14 activists at the MSI headquarters since November 16, demanding the release of the musician Denis Solis González.

On November 9, 2020, Denis Solís González was brutally detained by agents of the National Revolutionary Police (PNR) in the Habana Vieja municipality, a few blocks from his home. Since then, there has been no communication with the musician, and attempts to gather information on his whereabouts through official channels were unsuccessful. According to international standards, Solís González has been forcibly disappeared.

Upon arrest, the acting agents failed to present a valid arrest warrant, inform Solis Gonzalezof his charges and instruct him on his rights as a defendant.

As detailed in the judicial order in response to the Habeas Corpus filed on November 10, he was sentenced in under 72 hours to eight months of deprivation of liberty for the crime of “contempt” without receiving the most basic guarantees of due process. Additionally, on November 11, he was transferred to the maximum-security prison in Valle Grande.

Between November 10 and 18, there have been 34 arbitrary arrests of 20 individuals documented, alongside surveillance operations intended to prevent free movement and internet service blocks for artists, activists and journalists peacefully demonstrating for the release of Denis Solís. The various peaceful protests demanding the release of the musician have resulted in an escalation of violence.

Since November 16, approximately 14 activists, artists and journalists have congregated at the MSI headquarters, under siege from state security forces. At first, MSI was barred access. In response, they organized a poetic reading at the headquarters. Later, following the theft of their food, a few activists began a hunger strike. Finally, a substance that they suspect is hydrochloric acid, was thrown onto the door and roof of the headquarters, damaging their water supply.

It is important to highlight the information lockdown that has been implemented. Journalists and activists in solidarity with MSI have been prevented from leaving their homes for at least nine days. There have also been attacks on foreign press and arrests of independent journalists, who on November 22, sought to cover the demonstrations and/or meetings organized throughout the central parks of Havana.

Given the facts presented, the undersigned organisations urgently call upon the Cuban government to allow the International Red Cross entry so they can respond to the request for assistance MSI has issued over the past two days.

We also demand that the Cuban government declare the criminal proceedings against Denis Solis González void and proceed with his immediate release. We hope they respond to the call for dialogue from members of Movimiento San Isidro in order to protect the lives of the activists.

We also demand that the government allow citizens to exercise their right to peacefully protest and that the harassment and digital interference against those who participate in or carry out journalistic coverage of these events cease. It is indefensible, that the Cuban State, recently elected to occupy a place on the United Nations Human Rights Council, should engage in this type of systematic infraction of human rights in flagrant violation of all relevant international agreements and standards.

We also demand that the High Commissioner of the United Nations, Michelle Bachelet, condemn the multiple human rights violations perpetrated by agents of the Cuban State against the people engaging in legitimate protest at the Movimiento San Isidro headquarters.

We call on embassies, the European Union, and the special procedures of the United Nations and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, to firmly communicate to the Cuban State their condemnation and concern regarding these events, and urge it to assume its obligations to guarantee and protect human rights, especially as a member of the United Nations Human Rights Council.

International Civil Society Organisations

Acceso a la Justicia
ARTICLE 19 Oficina para México y Centroamérica
Asociación de Periodismo Investigativo (Abraji), Brasil
Cultura Democrática, Argentina
CADAL, Argentina
Centro de Justicia y Paz (Cepaz)
Centro de Acción y Defensa por los DDHH (CADEF), Venezuela
Civil Rights Defenders, Suecia
Defiende Venezuela
Diálogo por la democracia – Nicaragua
Demos, Guatemala
Extituto de Politica Abierta
Freedom House, EEUU
Foro Penal, Venezuela
Forum 2000 Foundation
Fundamedios, Ecuador
Fundación Ciudadanía y Desarrollo, Ecuador
Fundación Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, Nicaragua
Gobierno y Análisis Político AC, México
International Society for Human Rights
Instituto de Prensa y Sociedad, Perú
Justicia, Encuentro y Perdón, Venezuela
Movimiento por la libertad de Expresión
Observatorio de Libertad Académica (OLA)
People in Need, República Checa
People in Need, Eslovaquia
Programa Cuba de la Universidad Sergio Arboleda, Colombia
Programa Venezolano de Educación-Acción en Derechos Humanos (Provea)
Prisoners Defenders, España
Primero Guatemala
PEN Internacional
Un Mundo Sin Mordaza, Venezuela
A.C Consorcio, Desarrollo y Justicia
A.C. Generación Activa Venezuela
Fundación Nacional de Estudios Jurídicos políticos y Sociales. (Funejps)
Federación Venezolana de estudiantes de Ciencias Políticas. (Fevecipol)
Federación de Estudiantes de educación media. (Feneem)
Asociación Cultural AV Kreativhaus e.V – Alemania

Regional Organisations

Alianza Regional por la Libre Expresión e Información
DemoAmlat
Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe para la Democracia (REDLAD)
Red Latinoamericana de Jóvenes por la Democracia (JuventudLAC)
IFEX-ALC
Voces del Sur

Cuban Civil Society Organisations

Alianza Cubana por la Inclusión
Alianza Democrática Pinareña Vueltabajo por Cuba.
Asociación Civil Crecer en Libertad
Asociación Jurídica Cubana
Asociación Cubana para la Divulgación del Islam
Asociación Sindical Independiente de Cuba
Asociación Pro Libertad de Prensa
Center for a Free Cuba
Centro de Estudios Convivencia
Centro PEN de Escritores Cubanos en el Exilio
Club de Escritores y Artistas de Cuba
Comité de Ciudadanos por la Integración Racial (CIR)
Colegio de Pedagogos Independientes de Cuba (CPIC)
Centro Estudios Liderazgo y Desarrollo
Comunidad Judía Bnei Anusim de Cuba
Confederación Obrera Nacional Independiente de Cuba (CONIC)
Cubalex
Cuba Independiente y Democrática (CID)
Damas de Blanco
Democuba
Directorio Democrático Cubano
Monitor Legislativo Cubano
Libertad Cuba Lab
Grupo Demongeles
Grupo Anima
Fundación para la Democracia Panamericana
Fundación Nacional Cubano Americana
La Maleza
Libertad Cuba Lab
Instituto de Activismo Hannah Arendt
Instituto Cubano por la Libertad de Expresión y Prensa – ICLEP
Instituto Patmos
Instituto La Rosa Blanca
Iglesia Misionera en Cuba
Movimiento Apostólico“Viento Recio”
Movimiento Ciudadano Reflexión y Reconciliación (MCRR)
Movimiento Opositores por una Nueva República
Mesa de Diálogo de la Juventud Cubana
Mujeres Democristianas de Cuba
Observatorio Cubano de Derechos Humanos
Palabra Abierta
Proyecto Demócrata Cubano (PRODECU)
Partido Arco Progresista
Partido Autónomo Pinero
Partido Pedro Luis Boitel
Partido Demócrata Cristiano de Cuba
Plataforma Independiente para el Desarrollo Universitario
Puente a la Vista
Red Femenina de Cuba
Red de Líderes y Lideresas Comunitarios (RELLIC)
Somos +
Solidaridad Trabajadores de Cuba
Talento Cubano
Unión Patriótica de Cuba (UNPACU)
Mujer a Mujer

Independent media
Hypermedia
El Estornudo
Yucabyte
ADN Cuba
Rialta
Cubanet
CiberCuba
Cubs Inside
Diario de Cuba
14yMedio
ADN Cuba
Inventario
Mujercitos Magazine
La Hora de Cuba
Play-Off Magazine
VPItv – Venezolanos por la información
Radio Viva 24
Árbol invertido
Alas tensas
Palabra Abierta
OtroLunes – Revista Hispanoamericana de Cultura
Havana Times

Activists and Citizens

Hildebrando Chaviano
Roberto González
Rafael Almanza
Hilda Molina
Boris González Arenas
Mauricio Mendoza Navarro
Anay Remón García
Marta María Ramirez
Claudia Patricia Pérez Olivera
Víctor Fernández
Yamilka Lafita Cancio
Enrico Mosca Díaz
Miriam Herrera
Orlando Luis Pardo
Manuel Alberto Morejón Soler
Martha Beatriz Roque
Roberto de Jesús Quiñones Haces
Guillermo del Sol Pérez
José Gabriel Barrenechea Chávez
Raudel García Bringas
Bárbaro La Nuez Ramírez
Severiano Ramírez Díaz
Pedro Ramírez Díaz
Soraya Quijano Silva
Yerdlim Verá Perdomo
Yadira Frontela Bacallao
Tomás Álvarez García
Wilfredo Álvarez García
Miguel Coba García
Enrique Coba García
Ramón Rafael González Pentón
Yokendri Rico Arrea
Yoslovy Piñol Morra
Bárbaro Piñol Morfa
Lía VIllares
María Matienzo
José Raúl Gallego
Jorge Enrique Rodríguez
Amir Valle
Juan Omar Fierro
Hilda Landrove

https://pen-international.org/news/cuba-urgent-call-to-preserve-lives-of-strikes-concentrated-in-movimiento-san-isidro